Mr Michael Moss

Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon

01243 753032

info@michaelmoss.info

Replacing a worn out joint isn’t just about relieving pain as it was some years ago. Nowadays patients expect a more functional joint which enables them to continue with their increasingly active lifestyles. In the UK, more than 30,000 people undergo knee replacements each year, and nearly two thirds are women. Historically, knee joints were made the same shape but in different sizes. Now it is recognised that people’s joints are a different shape as well as a different size.

Why Shape Matters

 

In 2013 Mr Moss treated the captain of the Argentinian and South American polo teams, Ignacio (Nacho to friends) Figueras. He is one of the top 100 players in the world, with a six-goal handicap and has been the face of Ralph Lauren’s Black Label since 2005.

During the 2013 St Regis International Cup, he suffered a crashing fall as his horse somersaulted over him and he fractured his pelvis. 

"When I fractured my pelvis falling from a horse playing high goal polo in May 2013, at Cowdray Park Polo Club in West Sussex, I was totally unprepared for the pain and almost complete debilitation I experienced in those first few hours and days.  Having Mr Moss assigned as my orthopedic surgeon, at St. Richards Hospital, was a blessing.  As one of the UK's top orthopedic surgeons he wholeheartedly recommended that I should NOT have an operation on my pelvis, and instead to allow my body to heal naturally (for the first week under his daily care).

Keeping the greatest polo players playing

Frequently Asked Questions

Why do so many people need their joints replaced?

The most common reason is osteoarthritis which causes a patient to experience aching, stiffness, and eventual loss of mobility within the knee joint. Inflammation may or may not be present. The pain may be severe at times, followed by periods of relative relief. It often worsens after extensive use of the knee and is more likely to occur at night than in the morning. Stiffness tends to follow periods of inactivity, such as sleep or sitting and can be eased by stretching and exercise. Pain also seems to increase in humid weather. As the disease progresses, the pain may occur even when the joint is at rest and can keep the sufferer awake at night.