Mr Michael Moss

Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon

01243 753032

info@michaelmoss.info

Osteoarthritis is often visible on X-rays. Cartilage loss is indicated if the normal space between the bones is narrowed, if there is an abnormal increase in bone density, or if bony projections or erosions are evident. A blood test is often taken to rule out rheumatoid arthritis.

Mr Moss will conduct an examination of your joint and will ask you to describe the pain. He will record your medical history, often asking you a series of questions about injuries, infections, ailments you have experienced, and any medications you are taking.

From this information and examination, Mr Moss will choose the most appropriate treatment option for you.

Mr Moss uses a range of artificial implants, or prostheses, to replace diseased or damaged bone around joints. The implants mimic bone shape and can be made of metal, high density polyethylene or ceramic. They are made by Zimmer, the largest orthopaedic manufacturing company in the world.

Mr Moss is frequently used as a specialist advisor to Zimmer and works extremely closely with the prostheses manufacturer to develop some ground breaking products in the United Kingdom. Working this closely with Zimmer, Mr Moss has been able to successfully carry out some of the UK’s firsts for his patients.

To learn more visit: www.zimmer.com

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It is a degenerative joint disease that causes deterioration of cartilage between bones. It can be caused by aging, genetics, obesity, and joint injuries from sports, work, or accidents.

In 2012, 92% of hip joints replaced in the UK were needed because of osteoarthritis.

In the same year, 98% of the knee joints replaced in the UK were because the patient was diagnosed with osteoarthritis.

The most common reason is osteoarthritis which causes a patient to experience aching, stiffness, and eventual loss of mobility within the knee joint. Inflammation may or may not be present. The pain may be severe at times, followed by periods of relative relief. It often worsens after extensive use of the knee and is more likely to occur at night than in the morning. Stiffness tends to follow periods of inactivity, such as sleep or sitting and can be eased by stretching and exercise. Pain also seems to increase in humid weather. As the disease progresses, the pain may occur even when the joint is at rest and can keep the sufferer awake at night.

Every patient is different but post knee surgery you should receive perhaps six or more physiotherapy appointments.

Every patient is different but post hip surgery you should receive at least one physiotherapy appointment.

Following your appointment with Mr Moss, his practice manager Niki Bassett will get in touch to offer you a convenient date and time for admission. Following this discussion you will have an hour-long appointment with our pre-assessment nursing/physiotherapy team. This will be to discuss medical history, medication, recovery after surgery, equipment you may need, home circumstances and any worries you may have regarding your treatment. The nurse will liaise with Mr Moss’s anaesthetist regarding your test results. If the anaesthetist is concerned about your medical history he may ask you to attend another appointment to see him in clinic.

On the day of admission you will be taken to your room by one of our receptionist team. The nurse in charge of your care will confirm your medical history and check your medication has not changed since your pre-assessment appointment. You will then be prepared for theatre. Mr Moss and his anaesthetist will see you prior to theatre to explain fully what they will be doing and consent with be obtained.

Following surgery you will continue to be looked after in your own room by the nursing and physiotherapy staff.

Mr Moss or his anaesthetist will review you on a daily ward round. You will be visited daily by our resident medical doctor who is on-call to answer any questions. You will also be visited by our pharmacist to ensure the pain medication is suitable for you.

Commonly patients experience pain and swelling in the knee and find that everyday activities are uncomfortable. Walking may be restricted and sleep may be interrupted. Patients may notice instability or locking of the knee and occasionally a grinding sensation.

Though non-surgical treatments are always considered initially, if using medication and a can aren’t delivering enough relief, you need to be referred to a consultant orthopaedic surgeon by your GP before you can be considered for surgery.